World Passenger Steam Trains – Railroad Anthropology – N-Scale Model

steam locomotives

Milwaukee Rd 261 Restored and Powering! – Life to the Max

The American 4-8-4 locomotive – Milwaukee Rd 261, said good-bye in 2011, not knowing if it would ever be restored.  In 2013, it was indeed restored and running beautifully again!!  Yay!!

This is an episode from a 28-minute show called Life to the Max, which covers a Fall Trip in 2013.


National Film Board of Canada: 1959 Documentary

Steamtown_ Ian Shive

Here is a wonderful short documentary done in 1959, logged in the National Film Board of Canada, documenting a small window panning across the middle of the last days of steam locomotive dominance in Canada in the late 50s to early 60s.

By 1960, all but preserved tourist locomotives were gone in the United States.  But in Canada, a few steam locomotives were in service in the 60s.

In the UK and most of Europe and Japan, a few mainline steam trains were operating through the 60s and into the early to mid-70s.  It is also true that in North America, trains in general, were becoming less important as the automobile and airline industries worked hard to push the railroad out of public consciousness (and did not succeed in many ways).

In Europe and Japan, for instance, the railroads have continued to play a major role.  The nostalgic emotions for steam locomotives are still a major aspect of most cultures around the world.  This beautiful documentary uses interviews and the lives of those who had worked intimately with steam trains, to portray loss, change, and the contradictions of the passing of steam locomotives into the category of ‘relic.’  However, train travel in North America is again on the rise.  The railroads also understand the steam locomotive to be strong central figures in the bedrock of most modern societies and reminders of colonial and imperial might and industrial-technological advancement and and nation-building itself.  The steam locomotive will most likely not go away from human consciousness completely.

This documentary is certainly worth a quiet 30 minutes of our time with a hot drink along with our deepest connections to our histories and where we are headed as humans.

End of the Line by Terence Macartney-Filgate, 30 minutes, 1959.

http://www.nfb.ca/film/end_of_line

This is a superb short film for any steam and/or railroad fan or historian/anthropologist.


PSOV of the UK – Beautiful Steam Symphony Video

0 brittaniaPSOV

Some of you may note that once in awhile, I post a video by one of my favorite UK Steam video/DVD companies: PSOV http://www.mainlinesteam.net/

There are, however, many great videographers as well, from the UK.

Here is another video posted by Andy Edkins, a compilation of UK steam in 2013.


Steam on Film: “La bête humaine” (1938) – Slides & Vids

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Some of the most beautiful scenes of vintage European steam in film were crafted in French filmmaker Jean Renoir’s 1938 film entitled La Bête humaine (English: The Human Beast; and in the UK released also as Judas Was a Woman).

The film centers on an express train engineer who discovers his wife was seduced by a wealthy godfather and plots their murder. This murder is witnessed by a co-railway worker.  The plot complexifies further with the ramifications of this murderous path.

The express steam train pulled by French steam type 231 plays a major star role in the movie throughout, representing and symbolizing the human journeys, with beautiful photography and atmosphere.

Read more here:

Wikipedia

IMDb site

Here are some clips:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8HkAuF1M

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8HkAuF1M0p4


Train at the Crossing!

This is one of those sensual memories for those of us who grew up with steam trains.

Although I grew up in Japan in the 50s and 60s, the sight of a running steam train coming through the crossing while we stopped, heard, felt, smelled—is forever burned in memory, no matter what country.

Below is an example from the UK. User willhayfield has posted this wonderful short video of 34067 Tangmere pulling the Cathedrals Express special through Mottisfont and Dunbridge on October 2011.

Turn up the volume!


Night Time Steam! PSOV video

Steam running full speed or coming into stations is rare in the United States and in places such as Japan, even, where steam used to be the pinnacle of passenger travel.

However, in places such as the UK, Germany, Poland, Australia, New Zealand, and Italy– one can still see Steam Trains running without diesel helpers, strangulated speed restrictions, and tour-train looks that make the steam train appear toy-like.

One aspect of steam trains that is sorely missed in most places, is captured beautifully on DVD video by the UK video company–PSOV (Preserved Steam On Video).  This is one of the top five steam video production companies from the UK, in my opinion.

Below I show a wonderful example.  It is their collection of preserved UK steam running at Night.  Spectacular colors, reflections, sound and energy emerge.

For more information on this video, you can see it at this link:

http://www.mainlinesteam.net/Steam_at_Night.htm

The music is by ‘The Pargeters

For more videos by the wonderful DVD site, visit:

PSOV mainline steam

Enjoy the Trailer!

 


Beauty & Grit – Hopes & Dreams: MUSIC VIDEO

This is a great music video recently loaded onto YouTube by the young man “The Action Effect.” This is of American trains of the 40s to the 50s.

It’s a nice montage of Vintage Train action put to the music of Bruce Springstein’s “Land of Hopes and Dreams.”

From the 1920s through the 1960s, the railroads played a huge part in the imagination of the American people. While the rest of the world continued their respect for trains, the United States concentrated on planes and cars.  But in the U.S., there was the “Golden Age” and “revival.”

From its inception through the Golden Age of Passenger travel, trains were a strong part of American cultural identity due to its major role in the movement of goods and people, connecting lands and cultures and dreams as well as the violence and destruction and isolation that comes with these dreams.

Railroads leaders were usually ruthless, crushing smaller opponents and collecting their power to rule the land to lay the rails and rule the movements of food, shelter, clothing, oil, coal, stone. Moving mountains and shaping the lands to mold as well as adjusting to the lands, the rails created and destroyed lives, like dreams.

Young boys and girls stole away in the middle of the night to escape, perhaps, a boring and heavy life, or perhaps abuse and confinement, poverty and despair.  Taking what little they had in bags, meeting a friend or two, perhaps, at a pre-arranged meeting at midnight, jumping onto the trains, yearning for adventure and a “better life.”

African-American and Asian-American workers, searching for work and perhaps dignity in those days of a more emboldened and accepted dominant racist society, sought to work on the railroads to have livable wages and to be respected.  Porters and waiters and some of the best chefs of the lands, sought to work on the fancy and comfortable railroads, upon the trains that company executives, sports and entertainment stars and presidents often traveled. To wear the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad or the Pennsylvania, or the New York Central, or the Santa Fe or Northern Pacific and the countless other ‘Name-train” railroads were a mark of pride.  Young boys and some girls, dreamed of becoming engineers and agents on these railroads.

Promises of distant lands and different lives, promises of living wages and being looked at with dignity.  Back-breaking grimy work in track-laying and oil-loading and tunnel-making, marked sources of pride as well as resentment.

Love, hate, beauty, grime, political intrigue, assassination, assimilation and resistance– like life, are all present in the beautiful and grimy trains that passed in the day and the night.

Today, the workers and trains still work in America, albeit no longer in the mainstream cultural imagination.  But perhaps those days are slowly returning, in new forms.  The train is an important part of human consciousness and life.  It cannot be forgotten.

Enjoy this video put together and loaded by “The Action Effect.”  Song is by Bruce Springstein.


The 4-6-4 Hudson of the New York Central

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In the United States, in 1926, rail passenger travel was in its glory years.  That year, the New York Central Railroad, one of the most prestigious, powerful, and largest railroad corporations in the world at the time, wanted a faster and stronger locomotive to pull the longer and heavier passenger trains required by the increase in passenger travel in the United States.

That year, although the elegant and mightily Pacific steam locomotives had been handling the bulk of the fastest and longest passenger lines in the United States by most of the first world national railroad companies, the New York Central ordered the mighty 4-6-4 wheel arrangement “Hudson” locomotives, as they were to be called by the New York Central Railroads.

The Hudsons were popularized in the US American public via an intense publicity campaign.  Television ads, new movies, billboard signs and magazine articles abound.  Model trains pushed the “Hudson” as the epitome of the beautiful, grimy, energetic and powerful passenger steam locomotive that was constructed in the social imaginary during these times.

Later, the Hudson locomotive was re-designed on the exterior with a silver and gray streamlined body, which were assigned to the famous passenger trains: The 20th Century Limited and the Empire State Express.

Even later, as Diesel locomotives began erasing steam locomotives off their roster and into their garbage heaps, a stronger, faster and more efficient locomotive was to enter the New York Central Railroad’s roster–the Niagara.  I will cover this locomotive more in detail later.

If I were to be asked what is my most favorite of favorite locomotives of all time and I had to begrudgingly decide, it would have to be the NIAGARA.  But i am off-topic here.  Here I cover the Hudson locomotive, which dutifully and proudly served the New York Central from 1927 to the demise of steam in the mid-to-late 50s in the US.  Versions of the Hudson remained popular throughout the world however, into the 70s.

More reading: http://www.steamlocomotive.com/hudson/


Alan Pegler – Flying Scotsman Savior, passes away at 91 years old

On March 8, 2012, Alan Pegler passed away at 91 years old. Arguably the most famous internationally known steam locomotive is the Flying Scotsman, a LNER (former London & Northeastern Railway) Class A3 steam locomotive, #4472 of the United Kingdom. It was a famous express passenger locomotive of the time.  In 1972, the Flying Scotsman was brought on a tour of the United States. The tour was unsuccessful.

Alan Pegler is also credited with single-handedly “saving” the Ffestiniog Railway of Wales, from extinction, buying it and reviving it as a modern excursion/tour railway.

He had bankrupted his family fortune via the purchase and maintenance of the #4472 Flying Scotsman and was thought of by many to be obsessed.  However, most view him as one committed to his love of steam and historical rail in the United Kingdom.

LINK TO ARTICLE:

http://www.guardian.co.uk/theguardian/2012/mar/25/alan-pegler-obituary

The Flying Scotsman sits at the platform during an excursion in 2007.

 


Norfolk Southern (USA) Running Steam Excursions Again!

Nickel Plate Rd. 765 is one of the mainline locomotives to run excursions in 2012 for the program.

One of the largest and strongest railroad conglomerates in the United States, from 1838 through the Golden Age of Railroads in the US, was the Norfolk & Western Railroad (NW or N&W).

Through the years, as all large and powerful corporations do, the company bought out smaller and medium-sized rail companies as they all began losing business to the ever-increasing airline business and the automobile industries in the US.  Unlike Europe and Asian, where rail companies continued to play an important role in community lives and transportation, the US chose to relegate rail to the carrying of freight.  The NW merged with Southern Railway in 1982, to form the Norfolk Southern.

After the demise of steam in the late 1950s, certain rail companies continued to run excursion trips with steam locomotives, which were a large part of the steam and rail preservation consciousness.  The Norfolk Southern steam excursion program was one of the most beloved by fans. Its main locomotives included the N&W 611 and the N&W 1218 which are now displayed in museums but not running.  The excursion program ran its final steam excursion in 1994 . . . . . . . . until NOW!!

In 2010, the Norfolk Southern announced its plans to run steam excursions to celebrate its 30th Anniversary, working closely with the Tennessee Valley Railroad Museum.

In August-September 2011, the Southern Railway (SR) 630 was the first steam locomotive to kick-off the program, called: 21st Century Steam.

The Fort Wayne Railroad Historical Society announced that is big and popular  locomotive, Nickel Plate (NKP) 765 is also slated to run (photo above, and last video). The NKP 765 video is of an earlier trip for you to enjoy, anticipating the upcoming excursion.



INDIA: Preserved Steam

Locomotive WP 7161 is a Chittranjan Locomotive Works built engine, beginning runs  in 1965. This locomotive was re-built and brought back for a special run in 2012.

Most of the locomotives in India, during the reign of steam, were built, of course by the colonial British that ruled India.  Since then, American-built locomotives were also used.

This locomotive is one of the bullet-nosed streamlined designs that gained royal favor with the Royal Indian government and gave service on some of the more elite express train service across the Indian continent.


Soo Line (USA) #2719 in 2011

video by SD457500


Canadian Pacific Locomotive 3254 – photo by Dave Carney

 


Regular Steam “Plandampf” in Germany: Gerolstein Photo

In Germany, for either a weekend or one week, several counties and regions run regular, yes: REGULAR steam trains on their main and branch lines.  These are not “special” or tourist or excursion trains, but running regular scheduled runs.
Thousands of fans from around the world, visit the Plandampf to experience true steam.

This photo is one glance at the Gerolstein Plandampf.  Photo by Peters.


Evening Departure of the C57 and the Fireman – Japan

 


Video: POWER! USA Nickel Plate (NKP) 765 – the sight and sound in September colors

The beautiful 2-8-4  Berkshire type locomotive, the NKP 765, starts up in the fall surroundings on the Cuyahoga Valley Line in Tennessee for a September 2011 run.

Great video by dferg100.

For more information on the NKP 765, please visit the owner’s site:  The Fort Wayne Railroad Historical Society


Southern 630, USA – October 8, 2011

Southern 630 pulls an excursion for the Tennessee Valley Rail Museum on Oct. 8, 2011 through Georgia. Photo courtesy of John Higginson at Railpictures.net


Australia’s “The Legend”: Class 38 – the 3801


CHASING the SP 4449 !!! July 2011

Photo by Steven M. Welch at Rail pictures.net

On July 2 -3, 2011, the Southern Pacific 4449 pulled trains from Portland, Oregon to Wishram, Washington.

This is a great video of “Chasing” the locomotive on its trip.  The Photographer rides to shoot the video, while the famous steam chasing driver “Rich” shows his skills at providing ample and exciting distance and speed in order to capture the beauty and power of steam and the environs.

Video is posted by gregudolph.

The SP 4449 was called “The Most Beautiful Locomotive in the World” at the Height of Steam train popularity in the 1940s and 50s.  It is now housed, along with one of my all-time favorite steam locomotives of the US, the SP&S (Spokane, Portland & Seattle) 700.


Swansea-Mumbles Railway, Wales: World’s First Passenger Train 1804

First Swansea-Mumbles Line 1804. Courtesy of Peoples' Collection Wales.

The Swansea-Mumbles Railway, 1804 – 1960

Slideshow and Video

Although technical industrial know-how is often named and known by rail enthusiasts the world over, such as the invention of the steam locomotive, and speed record marvels, which are wonderful, of course–little known is the fact of the Swansea-Mumbles Railway line, the world’s first passenger rail service.

On March 25, 1807–the same day that the British Parliament passed the law outlawing the Transatlantic Slave Trade, Swansea opened the first passenger train in the world, charging a fee for passengers to be pulled on a rail line.  At this time, the passenger carriages were pulled by horses.  Then more carriages were added for form a multi-carriage horse-drawn rail train along the beautiful Wales coast line between Swansea and the charming town of Mumbles.

The line was closed and was derelict for a while, and various wealthy proprietors refurbished and re-established the line.

SLIDESHOW

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In 1877, steam locomotives were introduced to the line and pulled the train from that year to 1929, when trams took over.  Steam locomotives of the wheel arrangement 0-4-0 and 0-6-0 steam locomotives, of various “tank”  types, were used the pull the trains in the heyday of steam.  The line began electrifying its motive power in 1928.

In 1960, after closing a couple of more times, the line was closed officially by the government, even though there were an overwhelming amount of signatures protesting the closure.  The new owners at the time wanted to make busses the main way of travel, regardless of what the majority of local people wanted.

Golden Swansea website: http://www.welshwales.co.uk/mumbles_railway_swansea.htm

BBC: Early Mumbles Railway:  Early Mumbles Railway

Swansea-Mumbles – Wikipedia

History  – Video Clip from BBC Wales 1998:

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Reminiscences of Swansea-Mumbles.  circa 1960 – by AceMovieCo:


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