VIDEO – Watercress Line by Geralldus

Advertisements

Norfolk & Western 611, Famous Passenger Steam Loco is Reborn in 2015!!

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Since the early 1990s, Norfolk Southern (formerly Norfolk and Western) streamlined 4-8-4 steam locomotive has been dormant, with no plans for its revival, and placed in a museum.

In 2015, enough interest pushed finances to move forward to bring the beautiful locomotive back to life, and have the first test runs in the spring, then with full excursions from May through the summer.

Here are some video glimpses.

For information, contact the 611 page: http://fireup611.org/ 

National Film Board of Canada: 1959 Documentary

Steamtown_ Ian Shive

Here is a wonderful short documentary done in 1959, logged in the National Film Board of Canada, documenting a small window panning across the middle of the last days of steam locomotive dominance in Canada in the late 50s to early 60s.

By 1960, all but preserved tourist locomotives were gone in the United States.  But in Canada, a few steam locomotives were in service in the 60s.

In the UK and most of Europe and Japan, a few mainline steam trains were operating through the 60s and into the early to mid-70s.  It is also true that in North America, trains in general, were becoming less important as the automobile and airline industries worked hard to push the railroad out of public consciousness (and did not succeed in many ways).

In Europe and Japan, for instance, the railroads have continued to play a major role.  The nostalgic emotions for steam locomotives are still a major aspect of most cultures around the world.  This beautiful documentary uses interviews and the lives of those who had worked intimately with steam trains, to portray loss, change, and the contradictions of the passing of steam locomotives into the category of ‘relic.’  However, train travel in North America is again on the rise.  The railroads also understand the steam locomotive to be strong central figures in the bedrock of most modern societies and reminders of colonial and imperial might and industrial-technological advancement and and nation-building itself.  The steam locomotive will most likely not go away from human consciousness completely.

This documentary is certainly worth a quiet 30 minutes of our time with a hot drink along with our deepest connections to our histories and where we are headed as humans.

End of the Line by Terence Macartney-Filgate, 30 minutes, 1959.

http://www.nfb.ca/film/end_of_line

This is a superb short film for any steam and/or railroad fan or historian/anthropologist.

Steam on Film: “La bête humaine” (1938) – Slides & Vids

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Some of the most beautiful scenes of vintage European steam in film were crafted in French filmmaker Jean Renoir’s 1938 film entitled La Bête humaine (English: The Human Beast; and in the UK released also as Judas Was a Woman).

The film centers on an express train engineer who discovers his wife was seduced by a wealthy godfather and plots their murder. This murder is witnessed by a co-railway worker.  The plot complexifies further with the ramifications of this murderous path.

The express steam train pulled by French steam type 231 plays a major star role in the movie throughout, representing and symbolizing the human journeys, with beautiful photography and atmosphere.

Read more here:

Wikipedia

IMDb site

Here are some clips: